July 6th, 2006

magikist

(no subject)

I'm off to Singapore tomorrow. I'm not excited as much as I'm apprehensive.

I spent most of yesterday thinking about all of the things that could go wrong. The plane gets hit by an errant rocket from North Korea. I'm incarcerated in Singapore for "smuggling in" my blood pressure medicine or antidepressant (I have a copy of the prescription). I'm the target of Islamic terrorists. I draw the constant attention of the authorities because I have long hair. I come down with some rare tropical disease. I burn up my laptop with the power (even though the transformer is rated to 230 V and I have the appropriate adapter for Singapore). I meet with unfriendly people in Paris on the way back who make my flight back a living hell. Things that I know won't happen, but that I worry about nevertheless.

I'm definitely my mother's son.
magikist

(no subject)

Thanks, first of all, to all of you who left comments in my last entry, in which I expressed misgivings about my trip to Singapore that starts tomorrow. I appreciate your comments and well wishes; I know that this trip will probably go off with very little trouble. Heck, I know people who have gone to Singapore for several weeks at a time and come back alive and much happier for the experience. I'm just having my usual bout of pre-trip jitters, made all the worse by the fact that, instead of going 600 miles to visit a client, I'm going halfway around the world. Once I get there and get settled, I'll feel much better. I'm sure of that. Like I said, I'm like my mother, who foresaw disaster every time she got on an airplane.

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Mary and I saw The Devil Wears Prada the other day. It's not a masterpiece, but it is a very good movie, based somewhat on Lauren Weisberger's book of the same name. In fact, I read the book after seeing the movie. The general story is still the same (a recent college graduate goes to work for the imperious editor of a fashion magazine, and loses sight of who she is and what's important to her before catching herself), but they arrive at the same conclusion in two completely different ways. Aline Brosh McKenna did an excellent job of writing a screenplay that is faithful to the book, yet improves on it. She combines some characters (the movie's Nigel is a composite of several male characters from the book), changes the relationships slightly, focuses less on what's going on in Andy's life and more on her life as the assistant to Miranda Priestly, editor of Runway magazine, and really captures the "New York"-ness of the setting. The actors were fantastic, particularly Meryl Streep (who, I confess, I wasn't that fond of before this) as Miranda Priestly, Anne Hathaway (who I loved in The Princess Diaries movies) as Andrea "Andy" Sachs, and Stanley Tucci as Nigel.

I'm generally not all that thrilled about books that are adapted for the big screen. Forrest Gump was a very funny book, but it morphed into a feel-good story for the movie, and I still won't watch the movie again. Dave Barry's Big Trouble suffered from being too faithful to the book, and lost something without the author's drollery. This, on the other hand, could stand as a lesson in how to take a book and turn it into a movie.

I recommend both. A B for the book, B plus for the movie.
magikist

(no subject)

OK, so I went out today and bought some lighter-weight shirts from what I call the Alan Harper Collection (if you watch Two and a Half Men, you'll know what I'm talking about), I've packed and put everything in the car, and I'm off like a herd of turtles, as my stepfather would say. My flight to Chicago leaves at 10:15, so I have to be at the airport by 8:45 or so, which is why I'm leaving no later than 6:30 tomorrow. I'll post updates as I find time; I'll be arriving in Singapore at 11:30 PM on Saturday (11:30 AM Eastern Standard Time), so I should be in my hotel by mid-afternoon, or very early morning, depending on how you look at it.

See ya!